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“A thorough grounding in the logical analysis of arguments and the use of computational tools to solve problems is the sine qua non to be a citizen of modern society.”
Richard Holman, Ph.D.
Dean of Computational Sciences
Bonabeau Hero
Richard Holman, 
Dean of Computational Sciences
Accomplishments
  • Recipient of numerous awards, including the Richard Moore Award for Sustained Contributions to Education for the Mellon College of Science, the U.S. Presidential Scholar Teacher Award, and the Second Award for the Gravity Research Foundation’s essay competition in 2013
  • Awarded a grant from the Templeton Foundation for his research on the origin of the universe
  • Visiting Professor at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California at Davis, and McMinn Scholar at Vanderbilt University
  • Published over 100 articles on early universe cosmology and quantum field theory
  • Served on a variety of grant review panels, including the Department of Energy Early Career Grants, Department of Energy Lab Theory, and the National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Principal Investigator for Carnegie Mellon's DOE High Energy Theory grant

Dr. Richard Holman joins Minerva from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was a professor of physics. His current research concerns the interface between particle physics and cosmology, with a particular emphasis on the inflationary universe paradigm. He also works on more speculative ideas such as models of dark energy and the possible observable effects of the multiverse.

One of the brightest spots in Holman’s career has been his interactions with students at all levels. His teaching awards testify to how firmly he believes in his role as a mentor to the next generation of physicists. He has long been an advocate for women in STEM, and has also worked with the Pittsburgh Public School system as well as the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the Sciences, to encourage young students toward careers in the sciences.

Holman was a postdoctoral fellow at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of Florida, and an NRC Postdoctoral Fellow at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He earned his Ph.D. in Theoretical Particle Physics and M.A. in Physics from the Johns Hopkins University, and his B.S. in Mathematics from Harvey Mudd College.

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